401 Unauthorized from a content publishing site

New job, new problem. We’ve a SharePoint 2010 Publishing site using content deployment to push content from an authoring site collection to a live one – and the live site collection started to return an HTTP 401 – Unauthorized to any request for a page.

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401 Unauthorized from a content publishing site

"How to Optimize SharePoint WCM for Performance"

Really, this is just a link to the MSDN article “How to Optimize a SharePoint 2007 Web Content Management Site for Performance“. Nice easy title.

It does mention a particular irritation of mine – that many (most?) systems don’t use any kind of compression on static content. I remember seeing Apache admins complaining about people not using compression, oh, 10 years ago. In SharePoint, this is such a waste! JavaScript and CSS files are lovely and compressible – and core.js is big. So is Core.css. Doesn’t seem much reason not to enable it!

To do so, open IIS Manager, and right click on the ‘Web Sites’ folder. Select the service tab, and check the check box. Don’t go for dynamic compression; this would be a bad idea.

iis-compression

You’ll also want to check/edit the file types compressed. See Using HTTP Compression for details, and you’ll probably need to add the .JS and .CSS extensions.

I must sit down and give this a proper test some time. Certainly I don’t see the same sizes in the article, but then I’m looking at the file sizes on disc; in 12 Hive, and in the temporary compression cache (typically %WinDir%/IIS Temprorary Compressed Files). My numbers show Core.js to be 575Kb uncompressed, 91Kb after compression. Nice!

"How to Optimize SharePoint WCM for Performance"

Creating Test Certificates with MakeCert

I was having a bugger of a time setting up an SSL connection using a test certificate until I found this article by John Howard. One thing I would say – when using MMC to look for newly created certificates, remember to ‘refresh’ the view. Otherwise this works – shame I don’t entirely understand how… … still, at least my error “The server mode ssl must use a certificate with the associated private key” is now gone…

Creating Test Certificates with MakeCert

Ruby on Rails on Apache

I just got Rails working on Apache, which is pretty cool, and fairly straight forward really. My big complaint about the whole process is, though, that the tip below was necessary to make apache stop just returning errors…

Note from porter.ea:

One additional edit that I found necessary was to add “#!c:/pathto/rubybin/rubyw” (note the “w”) at the top of the “C:appnamepublicdispatch.fcgi” file.

It’s worth noting the bit about (for performance):
FastCgiConfig -maxClassProcesses 1 -maxProcesses 1 -minProcesses 1 -processSlack 1

Ruby on Rails on Apache